Common Pet Poisons and How to Prevent Pets from Ingesting Them

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Common Pet Poisons and How to Prevent Pets from Ingesting Them

Common Pet Poisons and How to Prevent Pets from Ingesting Them

One of the most common pet emergencies seen by a Gardner veterinarian is poisoning. A large variety of things can poison dogs and cats, and not all of them are obvious. Some are even species-specific, so they can cause devastation to one type of pet but not another.


Common Poisons

The most common poisons can kill any animal that ingests them – even humans. These include rat/mouse poisons, insecticides, certain fungicides, antifreeze, wet paint, and similar substances. These should be kept out of reach of all pets.

Dog Poisons

Dogs are susceptible to poisoning from some substances that are perfectly fine for humans. Chocolate is the most notorious of these. A number of human medications and supplements are also effective dog poisons. Some of these are over-the-counter painkillers, prescription heart medications, antihistamines, and the sweetener xylitol. Dogs can also be poisoned by human vitamin and mineral supplements.

Cat Poisons

Certain plants are known to be cat poisons. Lilies and insoluble oxalate plants like diffenbachia and philodendron cause the most cases of plant poisoning in cats. Cats are also susceptible to poisoning from household cleaners, glow sticks, and topical insecticides. They can be poisoned by medications aimed at humans, too.

Preventing Poisoning

The only sure method of poison prevention is to make sure your companion cannot ever reach something that could poison him or her. However, in the real world, this is harder than it sounds. You should never assume that poisoning cannot happen.

When Your Pet Gets Into Poison

The most important thing to do is immediately call your Olathe veterinarian. Your vet will advise you on whether you should do any first aid before rushing your pet to the office, or if you should just come right in. Once you get there, the pet will be given appropriate treatment, which may include stomach pumping, antidotes, or other therapies.

Make an Appointment With Our Local Veterinarian Today


Speed is essential to ensuring your pet's survival, so you should never wait to see if their condition gets worse. Come to Oakbrook Animal Hospital, a veterinarian in Gardner, for lifesaving treatment for pet poisoning.

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